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Benefit Sanctions: Help Shape a Fairer System


Public Law Project calls for insight into benefit sanctions.

Do you have experience of benefit sanctions?

The Public Law Project is researching the barriers that claimants face when challenging benefit sanctions.  As part of this we are keen to speak to: 

·         Benefit claimants who have been sanctioned by DWP (either recently or in the past)

·         Advisors and other individuals who have experience of providing advice or other support to sanctioned claimants.

Taking part would involve a one-off phone or video call with PLP’s Research Fellow, Caroline Selman, to hear about your experience of the sanctioning process. 

Your insights will be used to help shape a strategy for improving access to justice for claimants who have been unfairly or unlawfully sanctioned.  

Further information, including how we ensure the confidentiality and safe processing of any information you provide, is available on our website here:  https://publiclawproject.org.uk/latest/benefitsanctions/  

If you are interested in taking part, or if you would like to find out more first, please contact Caroline by either:

·         Completing the contact form here

·         Emailing c.selman@publiclawproject.org.uk or

·         Phoning 020 7843 1268

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